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Movie Review: The Man Who Could Work Miracles

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The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) is the story of George McWhirter Fotheringay (Roland Young), an everyday, average working class man who suddenly gains the ability to do miraculous works. Suddenly he is struck with the dilemma of what to do with his new-found power, which allows him to do anything from teleport police officer to another continent or turn swords into agricultural equipment. One of the things that he can’t do is affect the human mind.
Unsure of what to do now that he can have whatever he wants, Fotheringay seeks wisdom in those around his village. This ranges from the local barmaid to the local bank manager, and even the resident tailor. Each have their own take on what it takes to make the world a better place, some with more dogmatic and/or grandiose utopian concepts than others. And while George searches for wisdom he makes a mistake that will change the course of history.
H G Wells created a number of entertaining books that were later adapted for film, but this film steers away from Science Fiction that he is best known for, heading into the realms of Fantasy and Fairy Tale. Although the casting for this film was excellent, I believe that it is Wells’ humorous look at human natural that really makes this film enjoyable. If you are into retro comedy, this film is well worth watching.

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Author: keikomushi

Reader, Writer, New Media Buff, Anime Fangirl, Gnome Hunter, Last Action Femme Fatale, Appreciator of Nature, Jack-of-all-trades.

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